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[Cross-posted form New Books in Film] While there are a number of studies of how women are represented in popular culture, Norma Jones, Maja Bajac-Carter, Bob Batchelor’s collection of essays Heroines of Film and Television: Portrayals in Popular Culture (Rowman and Littlefield, 2014) looks at the heroine. From discussions of traditional characters such as Wonder Woman and Buffy, The Vampire Slayer, to more unusual heroic women in Kill Bill and The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, these essays show the strength of characters presented as champions. Co-editor Norma Jones reviews how the book was compiled, as well as her own contribution to the collection. These three also edited a companion collection, Heroines of Comic Books and Literature: Portrayals in Popular Culture, that grew out of the project behind the first book.

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Kimberly A. HamlinFrom Eve to Evolution: Darwin, Science, and Women’s Rights in Gilded Age America

February 23, 2015

Kimberly A. Hamlin is an associate professor in American Studies and history at Miami University in Oxford Ohio. Her book from Eve to Evolution: Darwin, Science and Women’s Rights in Gilded Age in America  (University of Chicago Press, 2014), provides a history of how a group of women’s rights advocates turned to Charles Darwin’s evolutionary theory […]

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Alina García-LapuertaLa Belle Creole: The Cuban Countess Who Captivated Havana, Madrid, and Paris

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Biography] One of the fundamental functions of biography is the preservation of stories. But it also acts to resurrect the stories that may have fallen from view, reinvigorating the tales of people who, with the passage of time, have become merely names on plaques. In La Belle Creole: The Cuban Countess Who Captivated […]

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Deana A. RohlingerAbortion Politics, Mass Media, and Social Movements in America

February 16, 2015

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February 6, 2015

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Donald P. Haider-Markel and Jami K. TaylorTransgender Rights and Politics: Groups, Issue Framing, and Policy Adoption

February 2, 2015

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Donald P. Haider-Markel and Jami K. Taylor are the editors of Transgender Rights and Politics: Groups, Issue Framing, & Policy Adoption (University of Michigan UP, 2014). Haider-Markel is professor of political science and chair at the University of Kansas, Taylor is associate professor of political science and public administration at the University of Toledo. […]

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Jenny KaminerWomen with a Thirst for Destruction: The Bad Mother in Russian Culture

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Stephen L. HarpAu Naturel: Naturism, Nudism, and Tourism in Twentieth-Century France

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Rachel MeschHaving It All in the Belle Epoque: How French Women’s Magazines Invented the Modern Woman

December 2, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in French Studies] Rachel Mesch‘s new book, Having It All in the Belle Epoque: How French Women’s Magazines Invented the Modern Woman (Stanford University Press, 2013), is a fascinating study of Femina and La Vie Heureuse, the first French magazines to use photography to depict and appeal to women readers and consumers. Divided into two parts focused on […]

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